Alexander Chee, currently the visiting writer at the UT Austin New Writers' Project MFA. Author of the novels Edinburgh (Picador 2002) and The Queen of the Night (forthcoming from Houghton Mifflin Harcourt). Inventor of #AmtrakResidency. Find me on Twitter @alexanderchee, if you like that sort of thing.


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Apr 23, 2014
@ 1:09 pm
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18 notes

But the ultimate heartbreak would come in the original Star Wars, when you see that however many years later, Darth is still Darthing around, broken as hell, strangling underlings, committing genocide, still completely subservient to Palpatine. This totally pathetic middle manager, clinging to a religion no one thinks is real anymore. Then you’d see Obi-Wan living in the desert, forgotten, and you’d see Anakin / Darth just murder him in this super-anticlimactic way. Like, Obi-Wan shows up at Anakin / Darth’s job, and Anakin / Darth just presumably goes back to work after killing him. And Anakin / Darth would make a desperate, misguided attempt at reconciling with his lost son, and rather than being this big reveal, it would just be another Don Draper-esque instance of sad dad Darth trying to do what he thinks is right, but which is actually totally wrong, because it might be too late for him, because the whole course of his life has been wrong.

What the “Clone Wars” Stuff Does for Star Wars’ Narrative Structure | The Tusk

I liked this piece.

(via bigredrobot)

(via bigredrobot)


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Apr 23, 2014
@ 1:08 pm
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100 notes

The variety of worlds science fiction accustoms us to, through imagination, is training for thinking about the actual changes—sometimes catastrophic, often confusing—that the real world funnels at us year after year. It helps us avoid feeling quite so gob-smacked.

Samuel Delany on how science fiction writers are shaping the future.

Also see why sci-fi authors get the future so right, then complement with Delany on good writing vs. talented writing.

(via explore-blog)


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Apr 23, 2014
@ 8:27 am
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23 notes

I tell this story to suggest that writing doesn’t correspond to lived experience just by reflecting or deploying it. The relation can take other forms: inversion, distortion, opposition; not merely wish fulfillment but hypothetical catastrophe. Fiction offers a set of parallel destinies: a mother who planned fantastic birthday parties, a pet dog that was actually a fox, a sister who slept with the gardener.

— From Leslie Jamison in this week’s Bookends. Is It O.K. to Mine Real Relationships for Literary Material? - NYTimes.com


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Apr 21, 2014
@ 3:08 pm
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14 notes

Kill me.

Kill me.


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Apr 21, 2014
@ 2:20 am
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2,556 notes

(via onehundreddollars)


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Apr 18, 2014
@ 3:46 pm
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You would think that a chain of fragments—however engrossing those fragments are—could only slow down a reader. Think of how long it takes to read a page of short paragraphs in David Markson’s late novels. Offill’s style has some kinship with Markson’s, but her novel is straightforwardly a work of realism, with characters and plot. She not only assembles her passages into a surprisingly fluid narrative, but uses her interpolated material to make the story move faster than conventional narration. She proceeds by analogy.

‘The Smallest Possible Disaster’ by Elaine Blair | The New York Review of Books


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Apr 18, 2014
@ 3:27 pm
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406,898 notes

Today.

Today.

(Source: maudit, via skittle-happy-matt)


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Apr 18, 2014
@ 1:13 am
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12 notes

This Jenny Offill quote has been making me laugh all week.

This Jenny Offill quote has been making me laugh all week.


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Apr 17, 2014
@ 2:44 am
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96 notes

losertakesall:

note-a-bear:

masteradept:

thehappysorceress:

kookychow:

www.kookychow.com

Such cruel treatment of avocado. 

What is this travesty…

I WOULD FIGHT THE PERSON WHO PRESENTED THIS TO ME

attention badfoodphotography

Want.

losertakesall:

note-a-bear:

masteradept:

thehappysorceress:

kookychow:

www.kookychow.com

Such cruel treatment of avocado. 

What is this travesty…

I WOULD FIGHT THE PERSON WHO PRESENTED THIS TO ME

attention badfoodphotography

Want.


Video

Apr 16, 2014
@ 4:33 pm
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14 notes

Anne Carson reading from her lyric essay poem “The Albertine Workout: 59 Paragraphs About Albertine”, on Albertine from Proust’s Remembrance of Things Past, and specifically focused on Volume 5, The Prisoner. Filmed at and by The Center for Fiction. This was missing from the Anne Carson tag on here and that seemed terrible, so, fixed.